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It’s About The Meat, Man!

My 17-year-old daughter, Angie, and I slowly closed in on a bunch of elk last fall. There were about 80 animals in the herd, including several bulls. We were 200 yards out when a small group of cows spotted us. Angie quickly rested her rifle on shooting sticks, made herself comfortable in deep snow and touched off a shot. Moments later, a fat cow lay still.

Angie had a cow tag, and if you think she was disappointed because she couldn’t shoot a bull, you’re wrong. This was a meat hunt, pure and simple. Our family serves game meat exclusively at home, and the flesh of cow elk is rated absolutely tops on our kitchen table.

A friend of ours had a bull tag that same year. He’s a good hunter, has good horses and spent plenty of time riding

Conservation Remains A Huge Part Of New York Hunting

Like most hunting laws,?conservation New York Style?started in rod and gun clubs. Organized hunters in the New York State Conservation Council decided it was necessary to do something about hunting accidents. Veterans returning from World War II swelled the ranks of hunters, and upwards of 150 hunting injuries — 15 to 20 of them fatal — occurred annually.huntcon

In several states, hunters and wildlife agency staff had been teaching hunting courses at rod and gun clubs and at conservation summer camps for years. New York’s Conservation Department records of this date back at least to 1944. Those courses, however, were reaching only a small percentage of hunters.

By 1949, the Conservation Council had agreed on mandating a gun safety course for younger hunters, and convinced the State Legislature and Governor to enact it. Of course, it was up to the

Coyote Busting – The Great Battle

Whoa, man. Whoa!

Whoa, man. Whoa!

Say “federal hunters” at your local watering hole and you’ll trigger a lot of quizzical looks, as people picture everything from hot-on-the-trail IRS agents to special prosecutors. But in fact, today’s federal hunter is just a pickup-driving, helicopter-flying westerner with one very unique job: He’s on the payroll to hunt down coyotes that kill livestock.

There are 750 coyote hunters working for a program called Wildlife Services (WS) under the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 17 western states.

Glynn Riley, 63, of Brownwood, Tex., is acknowledged by his peers as the best. He doesn’t hide his pleasure that he’s living his boyhood dream, and he frowns when he speaks about possible retirement. He’s a truly humble man, with a cowboy hat, a soft Texas drawl and mountains of respect from the local ranchers, who call him “Wolf

Thinking Hard About Hunting

onhuntingI myself am a hunter. But Matthew Scully’s recent dissent on hunting reminded me just how juvenile some politically correct folks are. For one thing, it doesn’t necessarily follow that, simply because Al Gore or Barbra Streisand despises something, that something is worthy of commendation. It often works out that way, I know, but it is unbecoming of a rational creature to let the Gores and Streisands of the world define virtue, even negatively.

Second, Mr. Scully’s essay was only partly an attack on hunting. Its deeper objection was to what he called the “smug insensibility” of “the Imperial Self, armed and dangerous,” of “man the all-conquering consumer facing the universe with limitless entitlements.” Hunting-bear hunting in particular- seemed to Mr. Scully to exemplify that “distinctively modern mix of sentimentality and ruthlessness” that has given us the yuppie, with his

Looking Back On Hunting And Social Change

By the late 1980s, the wandering of the previous decade was largely over. The “Me Generation” took hold with a vengeance. Mercifully, its reign was as self-destructive as it was brief. The arrogant excesses that landed one-time financial stars in jail also forced the nation to appreciate its more enduring gifts. A quiet rebirth of social conscience and a respect for the values of an abundant land came to the fore.

buckInternationally, the economics of the Cold War were taking their toll. Russia was in decline and perestroika was in the wind. America was once again facing a strange dichotomy–forced to look both outward as a world leader and inward at its own domestic problems. The same generation that had protested the bombing of Cambodia was raising families. What legacy would they leave for the generations that followed?

When more